mygit

[UNMAINTAINED] A cgit/webgit alternative, written in Rust
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commit 88a500cbd9d29366a791202c347bae6ab215fd33
parent 13cdf125a9fe25764061327e040d1a0095663534
Author: alex wennerberg <alex@alexwennerberg.com>
Date:   Sun, 14 Mar 2021 21:26:11 -0700

Rename project

Diffstat:
MCargo.toml | 2+-
MREADME.md | 6+++---
2 files changed, 4 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)

diff --git a/Cargo.toml b/Cargo.toml @@ -1,5 +1,5 @@ [package] -name = "mygit" +name = "grifter" version = "0.1.0" authors = ["alex wennerberg <alex@alexwennerberg.com>"] edition = "2018" diff --git a/README.md b/README.md @@ -1,4 +1,4 @@ -# mygit -- the world's smallest Git host +# grifter -- the world's smallest Git host A small, self-hosted git forge, with a web viewer for repositories and and a mailing list archive @@ -6,14 +6,14 @@ A small, self-hosted git forge, with a web viewer for repositories and and a mai Many people want to self-host Git in order to get rid of their reliance on GitHub or other institutions. However, the options for doing this are problematic in a number of ways. There are ancient CGI programs written in C or Perl like gitolite, cgit and webgit, and there are modern programs like gitea or gitlab that are essentially GitHub clones, with a lot of unnecessary complexity for many people's use cases. -I really like [stagit](https://codemadness.org/stagit.html), but it's a bit too austere for my use case and very "suckless" philosophy: e.g. doesn't support markdown READMEs. I also really like [sourcehut](https://git.sr.ht/) but it is pretty complex to self-host a single-user instance. A lot of the design of mygit is drawn from both these sources. +I really like [stagit](https://codemadness.org/stagit.html), but it's a bit too austere for my use case and very "suckless" philosophy: e.g. doesn't support markdown READMEs. I also really like [sourcehut](https://git.sr.ht/) but it is pretty complex to self-host a single-user instance. A lot of the design of grifter is drawn from both these sources. The simplest way to accept patches is through [git-send-email](https://git-scm.com/docs/git-send-email), so I also want to setup a mailing list archive. The simplest way to do this is via IMAP and the [public-inbox](https://public-inbox.org/README.html) model -- the mailing list does not send out messages but simply receives them. Users can use RSS/imap/web view to view the patches. This is step above the opacity of a personal email, but much, much easier to self-host than a full mailing list. Like a lot of git software, a lot of email software, like public-inbox and [hyperkitty](https://github.com/hypermail-project/hypermail) are ancient C/Perl programs with certain disadvantages. I think [sourcehut](https://lists.sr.ht)'s mailing list is a great example of a modern, easy-to-use mailing list software, but in addition to being challenging to self-host, also has some highly opinionated design decisions, like blocking all html emails, even multipart ones, and using a tilde in the mailing list address, which not all providers support. This project is on sr.ht until I can get it self-hosted. -* [ticket tracker](https://todo.sr.ht/~aw/mygit) +* [ticket tracker](https://todo.sr.ht/~aw/grifter) * [patches](https://lists.sr.ht/~aw/patches) ## Design